5 Health Benefits of Mulberries You Should Be Interested In

5 Health Benefits of Mulberries You Should Be Interested In Ripe mulberry berries in a bowl, freshly picked

Experimenting is good. Especially when it comes to food, trying new things or ingredients you haven’t given that much thought to. This is the segue I make to tell you that there are plenty of health benefits of mulberries you should maybe find out about.

It never ceases to amaze me how much fruits and vegetables can give our body exactly what it needs. And I feel great when I find a new, healthy ingredient. The health benefits of mulberries really are something to write home about. So what’s up with these mulberries?

In my country, mulberry trees grow on the street and ever since childhood; I’ve seen them as fruits that fall on the sidewalk and stain it – especially the black mulberries. They can sometimes make the sidewalk look like a crime scene – full of crushed, reddish fruit. I’m just saying: If I had known that they’re that healthy, I probably would have reached up and picked plenty of them.

I did know that they have a naturally sweet flavor with no added sugar, one similar to dried goji berries and figs. And that they’re rich in protein and iron, but also vitamin C, fiber, calcium, and antioxidants. You can have mulberries in the dried white mulberry version, which goes excellent as topping on pancakes or mixed in yogurt and smoothies. But let’s take an even closer look.

5 Health Benefits of Mulberries You Should Be Interested In

The health benefits of mulberries are great. Even if you get white mulberries or dark ones.

The best 5 health benefits of mulberries

1. Rich in fiber

A serving of one cup of mulberries has nearly 20 percent of the recommended fiber intake. They contain both soluble fiber in the form of pectin and insoluble fiber. This helps us maintain a healthy digestive system, decrease cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of many diseases.

2. Increased circulation

Thanks to the high levels of iron content in mulberries, there’s an effect of increased circulation. Iron helps transport oxygen throughout the body and boost the production of red blood cells. The distribution of oxygen to tissues and organs and your metabolism get a nice boost in functioning. Iron also helps you fight fatigue and feel more energized right when you need it, so they’re also great as a snack.

3. Plenty of vitamin C

Mulberries contain 190 percent of the daily recommended value for vitamin C per serving. And vitamin C helps boost your immunity, especially when we’re facing another gruesome flu season. Vitamin C also helps repair tissue, protecting your vision, and fighting oxidative damage that lowers the risk for heart disease.

5 Health Benefits of Mulberries You Should Be Interested In

Use magical mulberries as pie filling, and you won’t get enough of them.

4. Loaded with antioxidants

Mulberries are loaded with anthocyanins, a type of antioxidants with anti-inflammatory properties. They also improve blood circulation. Another antioxidant in mulberries is resveratrol, believed to have anti-aging effects. It also may lower blood pressure and reduce the risk for heart disease.

5. Lower cholesterol

A high level of cholesterol in your body is linked to increased risk of heart disease. Mulberries and mulberry extracts can reduce excess fat and lower cholesterol levels while bringing the ratio between “bad cholesterol” and “good cholesterol” to a more positive ratio. Other studies have raised up the point that mulberries help reduce the formation of fat in the liver, thus helping prevent fatty liver disease.

How to eat mulberries

You can have the fresh ones in fruit salads and fruit bowls, add them to the baked goods of your choosing, blend them into smoothies or milkshakes, or add them on top of yogurts. As for the dried mulberries, they can work well in trail mix, as a topping on your morning oatmeal, or eaten simply out of a ziploc bag as a snack. If you’re a fan of tea, then you can add them to the bottom of your cup of tea, for some extra flavor surprise.

I’m a pop culture nerd who thinks too much about fried bacon, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and life, the Universe and everything. I love food and sometimes you can see that on my hips, but I don't care that much about that.
What I do care more about is trying to eat healthier, even though I admit that I like to indulge in my food fantasies. I’m addicted to puns, so forgive me for that when you read my articles. I now know too much about nutrition to be fun to hang out with. So long and thanks for all the fish-based omega-3 fatty acids.

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